HISTORY OF PUTAGè – PIEMONTESI SAPORIS FROM AGNOLOTTI TO ZABAIONE – VOL. II – by Massimo Battaglio

  • On the cover: Dionyles Window, Acquare by Massimo Battaglio, private collection.
  • ISBN: 9788897382294
  • Pages 164
  • Cover Price : 11.00
  • Gender: kitchen
  • Environment: Piedmont
  • You can also find it from Amazon.it and Libroco.it

   

Description

Volume II: First, Second, and Outlines.

From agnolotti to eggnog, from sauces to digestives through cold and hot appetizers, pasta and risottos, soups, read, moist, roasts, fish, seconds of eggs or vegetables, cheeses, sweets, breads and wines. A roundup of three hundred and thirty-three items, including dishes and typical products, ancient foods and modern reworkings, memories of peasant cuisine, virtuosity of the bourgeois domestic economy and magic of the tables of kings. The discursive and pleasant exposition of the recipes, full of curious news, family anecdotes and educated references, does not diminish the scientific content of the work, in which each recipe is presented in its historical and geographical context, guiding the reader to re-propose it with current means and tools. The putagè, the cheap wood-fired kitchen of the nineteenth-century invention, still present in all the homes of our grandmothers, is evocative image of a recent past, of a living memory and devoid of nostalgic and mythological accents, which invites patience and science necessary in the kitchen.

Recipe index

Vegetarian recipes are distinct with a star……. The recipes suitable for vegan cuisine, with two stars…. Paste………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 5 81. Agnolotti…………………………………………………… 5 82. Plinalotti agnolotti………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 83. Agnolotti with rice……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9 84. Cojete or calhetas (cagliettes, cabiettes)……………  10 85. Bread cojete (pron. you're going to have to do this…………………………………………………………………………………. 11 86. Corzetti…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 12 87. Crozèt or crozetin cruset, crusetin)……… 12 88. Potato dumplings………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13 89. Potato dumplings with castelmagno…………………. 14 90. Gnocchi of rushes (pron. "It's a very sad day," he said. 14 91. Pumpkin and chestnut dumplings……………………… 15 92. Macaron macaru-n is macaroni)………. 16 93. Rabaton (pron. rabatu-n)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 16 94. Raviòle (pron. raviole is ravioli)………………….. 16 95. Raviòles, or "varaita Valley dumplings"………….. 17 96. Tajarin (pron. taiari-n is noodles)………………… "18 Risotti……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 19 97. Piedmontrise risotto………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21 98. Risotto with vercellese or Panissa…………………… 22 99. Risotto with livers……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23 100. Risotto with mushrooms………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23 101. Risotto with truffles……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23 102. Risotto with truffles and fondue…………………… 24 103. Risotto with gorgonzola…………………………… 24 104. Risotto with sausage………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 24 105. Rice and quaints…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 25 106. Rice and frogs………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27 107. Rice and turnips………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 28 108. Rice in Cagnon (pron. cagnùn)…………………….. 30 109. Vianda (rice and dried chestnuts)………………… "31 Soups and Soups……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 33 110. Broth with the royal pastes……………………………………. 33 111. Buzeca b'seca)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 35 112. Cizrà (pron. chickpea soup)……………… 36 113. Castelmagno celery cream……………….. 38 114. Fat beans with canavesana………………………. 38 115. Mach (pron. mac' – not translatable)……………. 41 116. White soup……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 42 117. Thistall soup………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 43 118. Tagged soup…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 43 119. Married soup……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 44 120. Minestrina with bombonin (bumbunin)………………. 45 121. Minestrina with the biavettes…………………………. 45 122. Polenta within… ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 46 123. Pucia, Pute, Putìa, Puut………………………….. 47 124. Supa mitonà (pron. S'pa mitunà)………………. 49 125. Supa dij barbèt sad'j barbèt)……… "52 126. Ajucche soup (pron. aiùche)………………….. "55 127. Chestnut soup 1…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… "56 128. Chestnut Soup 2…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 57 119. Onion soup……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 57 130. Leek soup……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 58 131. Cheese walser soup………………………………….. 61 132. Soup walser d'barley………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 62 Lessi………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 63 133. Mixed boiled…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 63 134. Cappone reado………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 64 135. Tuna calf……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 65 Roasted and braised………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 67 136. Braised at the barolo………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 67 137. Brus-cit……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 70 138. Boar at civet…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 70 139. Piedmont-etat ox fillet…………………… 72 140. Fricandò…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 73 141. Milk pig with apple pancakes…………….. 75 142. Sausage in red wet……………………………………. 76 143. Wine sausage……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 77 144. Rustida…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 78 145. Stuffed bag……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 78 146. Tapulon (pron. tap-lu-n)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 80 147. Trippa di Moncalieri…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 81 Lamb…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 83 148. Elder's lamb in my way………. Poultry and white meats……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 85 149. Stuffed cappone………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 85 150. Morozzo's fashionable cappone………………….. 86 151. Rabbit with canavesana……………………………. 87 152. Piedmont rabbit………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 88 153. Chestnut rabbit……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 88 154. Rabbit in black wet…………………………………. 89 155. Rabbit at civet………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 90 156. Golden Leon's Pharaoh…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 93 157. Pharaoh stuffed…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 94 158. Financier………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 96 159. Dip of mushrooms and livers with Cavour…… 98 160. Hare al civet………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 98 161. Snails in The Burgundian in Piedmont……… 99 162. Chicken with babi………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 100 163. Chicken to Marengo………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 101 164. Chicken with the "snake"…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 102 Fish. 103 165. River prawns of langhe……………….. 103 166. River prawns in salad………………….. 104 167. Sea wolf……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 105 168. Cod with anchovies (at water). 106 169. Fake fish or fishfish……………….. 107 170. Fish in carp…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 107 171. Torinese sturgeon………………………………….. 109 172. Piedmont trout……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 110 Fried………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 113 173. Balotin-e balutin-e.m. 113 174. Batsoà (pron. Batsuà)…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 113 175. Frisse Novaresi…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 114 176. Frisse monferrine and canavesane…………… 115 177. Fried mixed with Piedmont………………… 116 178. Friciolin doss friciuli-n dus)…………. 118 179. Grive……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 119 180. Pilot……………………………………………… 120 181. Frogs to the vercellese…………………………. 121 182. Subric (pron. meat and apples……. 122 183. Subric (pron. s.bric) of potatoes…………… "123 Second egg dishes…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 125 184. A rogue frief (pron. "friness wrinkle")……… 125 185. Artichoke omelette "i.e. articiocchi"….. 126 186. Sunflower omelette……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 128 187. Luvertin omelette……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 129 188. Netthas omelette………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 129 189. Viole omelette……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 130 190. Cirighèt eggs………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 130 Second vegetable dishes…………………………… 131 191. Asparagus at Cavour…………………………….. 131 192. Asparagus with fondue………………………….. 133 193. Eggnog asparagus…………………….. 133 194. Asparagus "en branche"……………………….. 135 195. Ivrea onions in bittersweet………….. 135 196. Artichokes at Cavour………………………….. 136 197. Artichokes in fricassea………………………….. 137 198. Cardi gratinized……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 137 199. Truffle cardi…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 138 200. Chickpea flour………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 139 201. Galettes of thistle hunchback and castelmagno. 139 202. Glore in Talhiun……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 141 203. Cabbage salad………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 141 204. Sunflower salad………………………………….. 142 205. Potatoes with savoiarda…………………… 143 206. Peppers stuffed with cheese……………. 144 207. Peppers stuffed with rice in Turin……. 145 208. Piedmont-in-a-bowl tomatoes…….. 146 209. Cold Piedmont-stuffed tomatoes… 147 210. Hot Piedmont-stuffed tomatoes… 148 211. Ratatuia………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 148 212. Sancrao sancrau – sauerkraut)……… 150 213. Spinach with cream………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 151 214. Spinach to raisins…………………………….. 152 215. Topinambur trifolati………………………….. 152 216. Zucchini in carpon………………………… Recipe Index……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 156 Figure Index………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 160 Opera Index……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 162

Maximus Battalion

Massimo Battaglio was born in Turin in 1965. Graduated in architecture in 1992, he lives and works in Mirafiori, alternating the strictly professional activity, with painting, writing and passion for cooking. The author of numerous monographs on historic buildings in Piedmont, with WLM he published, in 2011, the book Amori Urbani, a bit collected, a bit of a tourist guide, where every love story is accompanied by illustrations of the author and historical notes. In 2015 he published for WLM, with great success, Stories of the putagè, a work of traditional Piedmont cuisine in 3 volumes, the result of a thorough historical research and complete with vintage images. With the historical novel The Daughters of Giulia (WLM 2016), she returns to fiction.

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